Just take a minute to think about how much of our world today is made up of other peoples dreams and ideas. How much of it is shaped by opinion, faith, prediction, and theory. Political leaders take power to practice tackling threats we’ve been persuaded to believe in. Companies sell you products because they trick you into thinking you need them. It’s a stone called fact that most of our lives are determined by the dreams of others. But ask yourself why do you buy into them?

It’s a lifestyle you’ve been taught you need right from birth and all thanks to those who dreamt of capitalism. It’s because you’ve been sold the idea that hard work equals a good person. That more money means more freedom. But that’s someone else’s dream, you didn’t come up with that. The value of the money in your bank account and the value of the things you buy may seem fixed even when they fluctuate but in truth they are completely arbitrary. They are based on the values of those who sell them, who manufacture, and who pull them out of the ground. It is entirely up to you if you choose to buy into these realities.

Watch the video from the Strange Mysteries YouTube channel.

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If we imagine the dreamer calling out to himself in the midst of the illusory dream world, but without disturbing it, ‘It is a dream, I will dream on’, and if this compels us to conclude that he is deriving intense inward pleasure from looking at the dream, but if on the other hand the ability to dream with such inner pleasure in looking depends on us having entirely forgotten the day and its terrible importuning, then we may interpret all of these phenomena, under the guidance of Apollo, the diviner of dreams, roughly as follows. There is no doubt that, of the two halves of our lives, the waking and the dreaming half, the former strikes us being the more privileged, important, dignified, and worthy of being lived, indeed the only half that truly is lived; nevertheless, although it may seem paradoxical, I wish to assert that the very opposite evaluation of dream holds true…

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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